Faq's

Celiac Disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestines.

About 1-2% of the population has Celiac Disease It is estimated that only 10-20% of the people are diagnosed, and there are many who suffer from misdiagnosis and/ or have delayed diagnosis When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the lining of the small intestine. When the small intestine becomes
damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body. (1) Celiac disease is hereditary, meaning that it runs in families. People with a first-degree relative with celiac disease (parent, child, sibling) have a 1 in 10 risks of developing the celiac disease (1). Celiac Disease can be triggered at any age. Left untreated, it can lead to many health problems such as anemia,
osteoporosis, infertility and miscarriage, neurological conditions like epilepsy and migraines, short stature, intestinal cancers; and may cause other autoimmune disorders such as Type 1 diabetes or thyroid disease (1). Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten may also be present in other household items such as medicine, vitamins, and cosmetics (1). Celiac disease is different from a wheat allergy. (2) A gluten-free diet is also recommended for people with wheat allergy, gluten sensitivity, and other autoimmune conditions such as Hashimoto’s and Rheumatoid Arthritis. (3) Gluten-free diets should not be used for weight loss or as a low carb diet. Gluten and grains should not be avoided if you don’t have any of the above-listed conditions (4).

Gluten-Free Diet
Importantly, wheat free may not mean gluten-free. Wheat-free foods still may contain rye or barley. It’s best to avoid all wheat, rye, and barley. Malt and malt flavorings are made from barley and are not gluten-free. Gluten may also be present in other household items such as medicine, vitamins, toothpaste,
lipstick, and chapsticks. A gluten-free diet is one that avoids all products made from or containing wheat, rye, and barley. It is best to focus on eating foods that are naturally gluten-free rather than depending on packaged gluten-free products. It is important to be mindful about cross contamination and
hidden sources of gluten. Nutrients for consideration Calcium and Vitamin D
Malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium are common in advanced and untreated celiac disease, thus leading to bone disease (osteopenia, osteoporosis, osteomalacia) (5). Nondairy sources of calcium include leafy greens (such as collards, broccoli, bok choy), calcium-set tofu, nuts, seeds, fortified non-dairy milk, dried figs, blackstrap molasses, chickpeas and other white beans, tahini, and the gluten-free grains Teff and amaranth. (6)

Protein is a nutrient made of amino acids, which are the building blocks for many of your body’s structures, including muscles, bones, skin, and hair. Amino acids also play an important role in the creation of many substances (such as hormones and enzymes) that you need to live a healthy life.

There are nine amino acids that our bodies cannot make on their own. These are considered “essential amino acids”. This means we must consume proteins
containing these essential amino acids from the food we eat. Contrary to popular belief, it is not difficult to meet your protein needs on a vegetarian or plant-based diet. Studies show that most vegetarians and plant-based meet or exceed their daily protein requirements. Focusing on a variety of protein-rich foods
throughout the day will ensure you get the needed amounts of amino acids in
your diet. Plant Proteins Most plant foods (with the exception of soy, quinoa,
and spinach) may be low in one or two essential amino acids. However, you can get enough of the essential amino acids by including a variety of whole plant foods in your diet. It was once thought that plant protein needed to be combined within a meal by mixing grains and legumes to create a “complete” protein, also called complementary proteins. Modern science has recently
revealed that our liver can store amino acids long term, meaning we do not have to combine them in one meal.

Legumes (or pulses), which include beans, lentils, and dried peas are rich sources of protein. Other sources of plant-based protein include whole grains,
vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Certain whole grains, such as wheat varieties like
farro, Kamut®, and wheat berries provide up to 11 grams of protein per cup. Protein-rich vegetables include spinach (5 grams per cup, cooked) and peas
(8 grams per cup, cooked). A variety of easy-to-use meat alternatives can be
found in most supermarkets, such as veggie burgers, meatless bacon, hot dogs, and ‘beef’ crumbles, as well as faux chicken nuggets, sausage, and ‘beef’
strips. Meat alternatives can help ease the stress of meal planning or are a great item to bring to a friend’s cookout. However, you’re better off
choosing minimally processed plant food sources of protein that have lower levels of sodium and no artificial additives. Plant proteins are naturally packed with other beneficial nutrients like fiber, vitamins, minerals, healthy fat, and antioxidants. They typically contain very little saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. This may be one reason why vegetarian and plant-based diets are linked with a lower risk of disease. Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Proteins Animal protein, such as that found in meat, dairy, and eggs, is considered “high quality” protein because it has high amounts of all nine essential amino acids. Meeting your protein needs may be more easily accessed on a vegetarian (versus plant-based) diet because you can include high-quality animal protein

Well-balanced vegetarian diets reduce the risk of many chronic diseases and may treat, improve or reverse obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and some digestive problems. They also offer promise in the treatment of cancer and kidney disease.

Overweight / Obesity
The high fiber and nutrient density (more nutrients for fewer calories) of vegetarian diets might be one reason why these eating styles may support healthy weight loss. The fiber in beans, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables can provide extended fullness after meals and re-balance gut bacteria to support efficient metabolism. Since obesity is a risk factor for most of the chronic diseases discussed below, healthy weight loss can aid in their treatment.

Heart Disease
Vegetarian diets help treat heart disease by addressing obesity, and the low saturated fat content of plant foods helps reduce cholesterol production. Good sources of soluble fiber, such as beans, barley, oats, and certain fruit, including apples, peaches, pears, and plums, help reduce blood cholesterol levels. Plants contain thousands of other plant chemicals and healthy oils that can literally treat disease thus reducing risk of heart attack and stroke.

Type 2 Diabetes
Vegetarian/plant-based diets help treat diabetes, mostly through weight loss. The high fiber content found in a vegetarian diet helps control blood sugar swings after meals and the resulting fullness helps control intake and hunger cravings, increasing satiety and fullness and stabilizing blood sugar levels. Eating more whole grains may also supply greater amounts of nutrients needed to help your body use blood sugar more efficiently. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) In addition to supporting weight loss, meals based around mostly home-prepared, unprocessed plant foods may support healthy blood pressure since they are naturally low in sodium. Starting from such a healthy base may then allow moderate use of added salt or salty ingredients. Overall, be cautious about sodium intake from foods like bread, breakfast cereals, cheese, bottled sauces, marinades and dressings, soups, processed foods, and restaurant meals. Additionally, most fruits, vegetables and especially beans are high in potassium which also may be essential to restoring healthy blood pressure.

A recent survey found that 52% of Americans are choosing more plant foods, such as non-dairy milk, meat alternatives, and plant-based products than they did previously. (1) Sales of plant-based foods are up 20% and the plant protein market is forecasted to reach $5 billion annually by 2020. (2) Eating predominantly plant-based foods is associated with beneficial health outcomes such as lower cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and reduced risk of many chronic diseases. (3) Changing eating habits can be challenging, but these tips will help you make these changes permanent, and delicious, so you can reap the rewards. Eat more of the plant-based foods you already like. Have you eaten peanut butter and jelly sandwiches? Oatmeal with nuts and fruit? Stir-fry with vegetables? You are already eating plant foods! Start by expanding these
meals and increasing the fruits, vegetables and beans you currently eat. Make other meals more plant-based by adding your favorites. Replace or eliminate the animal foods you don’t eat often. You won’t miss these so let them go first. Substitute plant protein for meat protein in recipes you already love. Try
adding legumes like soy, tempeh or beans or choose from a plethora of ‘plant-based meats’ that mock the taste and texture of chicken, beef or pork. Exchange cow milk for plant milk such as soy, almond, oat, hemp, or cashew. Many alternatives exist; try a few to find the ones you like. Check the nutrition label for calcium and protein content as levels vary.

You don’t have to give up all of your favorites animal foods immediately.
If you love pepperoni pizza, suddenly removing it from your diet may seem like a sacrifice The most sustainable changes come when they are done over time. Make the easiest changes first and when those no longer feel new, move onto the more difficult ones. Trust that your taste buds will adjust and with it, your preferences. Explore familiar – and unfamiliar – grocery stores and ingredients. Health food shops, grocery stores, and international markets carry a variety of plant-based foods like plant milk, plant-based meats, interesting produce, a myriad of spices, and a variety of products you may be unfamiliar with. There are many types of soymilks, rice, grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds and even more ways to eat and prepare them. Make time to try new foods and different preparation methods. Have fun with this. Stock your kitchen with healthy plant-based whole foods. If you do this, it will be harder to lapse into old ways. Form habits and prepare your environment so when you are busy and pressed for time you have healthy, plant foods available to eat. Canned or prepared soup and beans and pre-cooked grains stored in the fridge reduce preparation time. Foods like hummus and other bean dips with baby
carrots, lightly steamed cauliflower, or apple slices makes snacking easy and healthy.

Babies can grow and develop normally if they are given a well-planned vegetarian diet.

Breast milk is the best food for a baby. Breast milk is the only food infants need until they are 6 months old. If breastfeeding is not possible, use a commercial cow’s milk or soy-based iron-fortified formula. At 6 months, solid foods should be introduced. Breastfeeding, ideally, or formula feeding should continue until at least 1 year. Vegetarian diets, including Lacto-Ovo, lacto, or plant-based, can meet the needs of older infants. Fruitarian and raw food diets are not recommended for babies. These diets may be too low in calories and nutrients. Breastfeeding
Vegetarian women who are breastfeeding need to eat foods and/or use supplements that contain vitamin B12 every day. Foods that provide vitamin B12 include fortified nutritional yeast, fortified soymilk or other plant milk, fortified cereal, fortified meat analogs, and dairy products. Breastfed babies need to be given an infant vitamin B12 supplement if the mother is not eating foods fortified with vitamin B12 and/or using a supplement providing vitamin B12 every day. Breast milk is low in vitamin D. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all breastfed infants be given vitamin D drops providing 400 IU of vitamin D per day starting soon after birth. Iron is needed for growth and development If the baby’s stores of iron are low, iron supplements may be needed. If the local water source is not fluoridated, breastfed infants should be given fluoride supplements after age

You don’t have to give up all of your favorites animal foods immediately.
If you love pepperoni pizza, suddenly removing it from your diet may seem like a sacrifice The most sustainable changes come when they are done over time. Make the easiest changes first and when those no longer feel new, move onto the more difficult ones. Trust that your taste buds will adjust and with it, your preferences. Explore familiar – and unfamiliar – grocery stores and ingredients. Health food shops, grocery stores, and international markets carry a variety of plant-based foods like plant milk, plant-based meats, interesting produce, a myriad of spices, and a variety of products you may be unfamiliar with. There are many types of soymilks, rice, grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds and even more ways to eat and prepare them. Make time to try new foods and different preparation methods. Have fun with this. Stock your kitchen with healthy plant-based whole foods. If you do this, it will be harder to lapse into old ways. Form habits and prepare your environment so when you are busy and pressed for time you have healthy, plant foods available to eat. Canned or prepared soup and beans and pre-cooked grains stored in the fridge reduce preparation time. Foods like hummus and other bean dips with baby
carrots, lightly steamed cauliflower, or apple slices makes snacking easy and healthy.

Iron Overview
Iron is a mineral that is naturally present in many foods, added to certain food products, and available as a dietary supplement. It is an essential mineral needed to help red blood cells supply oxygen to our muscles for energy. It is also involved in other body processes such as helping to build our immune system and DNA synthesis.

Iron Deficiency
Iron deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency globally. It occurs most often in young children, pregnant women, and women of childbearing age. Iron
status is easily assessed through blood tests administered by a physician.
Low iron levels can result in anemia. Symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are fatigue, a fast heartbeat, and shortness of breath during physical activity.

Dietary Iron
There are two types of iron in food: heme and nonheme. Much of the iron in meat is heme iron, which is more easily absorbed from food and used by your body. Plant foods contain only non-heme iron. Although some plant foods are good sources of iron, it is often attached to compounds that reduce its absorption. These compounds are called phytates and are found in whole grains and dried beans. Compounds in coffee and tea also reduce iron absorption, as do calcium supplements.

Vitamin C can counter the effects of some of these compounds. Eating vitamin C-rich foods and iron-rich foods at the same time can increase iron absorption. Good sources of vitamin C include oranges, grapefruits, strawberries, green leafy vegetables (kale, collard greens, Swiss chard), broccoli, Brussels sprouts, bell peppers (yellow, red, and green), and cauliflower. Iron and Vegetarians
Vegetarian (including plant-based) men and women tend to have less iron stored in their bodies than people who eat meat. There is not a separate iron daily requirement for vegetarians. However, doing the following to increase iron absorption will be more effective than increasing the amount of iron in your diet:
• Include vitamin C-rich foods in meals
• Drink coffee and tea between meals rather than with them
• Take calcium supplements between meals If you think you might have low iron, ask your doctor to test for it. Iron supplements are the treatment for
anemia for both vegetarians and meat-eaters. Iron and Chronic Disease
Everyone has iron storage in his or her body. Vegetarians tend to have lower scores than people who eat meat. Their lower stores may be beneficial as too much iron in the body may contribute to diabetes and possibly premature death. High amounts of iron in the diet may also contribute to

Choline is a nutrient commonly grouped with B-vitamins. Choline has a variety of functions: It is part of cell membranes, helps nerves function properly, plays a role in liver function, is linked to our memory and mood, and may work with folic acid during pregnancy for the development of a baby’s brain and nervous system.

Meeting Your Daily Choline Requirement
The recommended amounts listed in the chart to the right meets the needs of individuals. Women who want to become pregnant should include choline-rich foods in order to reduce the risk of neural tube defects. Food Sources of Choline
The body naturally makes choline in the liver, but it is not enough to meet our recommended intake. Eating a well-balanced vegetarian diet with a wide variety of whole foods should help you get most of the nutrients your body needs. Although eggs and meat tend to be the highest sources of choline, it is found in a wide range of plant foods in smaller amounts. It is important for plant-based to carefully consider prioritizing foods that are good sources of Choline.

Special Considerations
plant-based women who may become pregnant or plant-based with special dietary concerns should consult with a registered dietitian nutritionist. An RDN can provide individual recommendations for a healthy eating plan to meet your needs.

Soyfoods can play an important role in vegetarian diets. Tofu, tempeh, soymilk, and foods made from soy protein are good sources of a number of nutrients.

These foods may also have key health benefits. However, articles in magazines and blogs on the Internet have raised questions about the safety of soyfoods. These questions focus on soy isoflavones and the absorption of minerals from soyfoods.

Soy Isoflavones
Isoflavones are plant estrogens, also known as phytoestrogens. They are not, however, the same as the hormone estrogen. In some parts of the body, isoflavones act like estrogen, while in other parts, their effect is the opposite of estrogen. This means that in theory isoflavones may provide some benefits of estrogen without the hormone’s harmful side effects.

Effects in Men
Two men who ate very high amounts of soyfoods—as many as 12 to 20 servings per day—experienced some feminizing effects. But studies of men who eat more usual amounts of soy show no such effects. In fact, even when men ate the equivalent of 6 servings of soy per day, which is much more than the usual Asian intake of about 2 servings per day, there were no effects on testosterone levels. Studies also show that isoflavones have no effect on sperm or semen.

Effects on Breast Cancer
While there is some evidence that suggests estrogen therapy may increase breast cancer risk in older women. However, most research shows that soy isoflavones

don’t have this effect. In fact, eating soyfoods is linked to better prognosis in women who have breast cancer. Additionally, young girls who eat soy may have a lifelong lower risk of breast cancer.

Thyroid Function
Soyfoods have no effects on thyroid function in healthy adults. This is true even when people regularly consume soyfoods for several years. A small number of people with poor thyroid function who are not taking medication may need to monitor their thyroid when first adding soyfoods to their diet to see if any changes in thyroid function occur. Those who take thyroid drugs, however, can safely consume soyfoods as long they separate the time from which they take their thyroid medication from the time they consume soyfoods.

Recommendations are between 1 and 3 hours

Myth #1: A Vegetarian/plant-based Diet is not safe for a Growing Child
A well-planned vegetarian/plant-based diet is safe for people of all ages, including babies, children, teenagers, pregnant mothers, and adults. Consuming a variety of nutritious plant foods can provide all of the nutrients children need during this an important time of growth. However, adding fortified foods or supplements may be required.

Myth #2: It is Hard for a Vegetarian/ plant-based to Eat Enough Protein
It is very easy to consume enough protein on a plant-based diet, as long as a person eats a variety of foods throughout the day. Good sources of protein include legumes (lentils, beans, peas), soy-foods (tofu, tempeh, edamame), seitan, meat alternatives (veggie burgers, plant-based crumbles), milk (cow’s milk and soy milk), nuts, seeds, and grains (farro, millet, quinoa). Protein requirements can be met when a variety of plant foods are eaten and overall calorie needs are met. All of the essential amino acids can be eaten throughout the day and there is no need to ‘combine proteins’ at the same meal.

Myth #3: You Have to Eat Fake Meat
Being vegetarian does not mean you have to resort to only eating meat alternatives. While meat alternatives are becoming increasingly popular and can fit into a healthy diet, there are many wholes, plant-based food options that are sure to please any palate. It’s important to note that not all meat alternatives are created equal be sure to read the ingredients and nutrition fact labels to ensure they are made from quality ingredients and are not too high in salt, added sugars, or saturated fat.

Myth #4: Going Vegetarian/plant-based means you have to give up most foods
Vegetarians and plant-based have an enormous amount of nutrient-dense food options to choose from. Giving up animal products will allow you to explore new foods. A plant-based diet is typically rich in whole grains (brown rice, millet, barley, oats, whole wheat bread), a variety of fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes (such as lentils, chickpeas, kidney beans, adzuki beans), soy foods (tofu, tempeh, miso), seitan, etc. A vegetarian diet will include those foods and may or may not include dairy products and eggs. Go ahead, be adventurous and try some new foods today!

Soyfoods are the only commonly consumed foods that provide significant amounts of isoflavones

Isoflavones, plant chemicals that are also called phytochemicals, have biological activity but are not nutrients. These compounds are referred to as plant estrogens or phytoestrogens. Foods that are rich in isoflavones include Asian soyfoods like tofu, soymilk, miso, and tempeh. Most of these soyfoods contain about 3½ milligrams
of isoflavones for every gram of protein. For example, a ½ cup of regular tofu has about 8 grams of protein and about 28 milligrams of isoflavones. Certain types of food processing reduce the number of isoflavones in foods. Products such as soy-based meat analogs often have much lower amounts of isoflavones. In Japan and urban areas of China, people consume about one to two servings of soyfoods per day. Older people whose diets are more traditional often have much higher intakes than younger people. Since people in the U.S. eat few soyfoods, their isoflavone intake is very low. Both isoflavones and the hormone estrogen bind to estrogen receptors in the breast and other tissues. There are two types of estrogen receptors in the body. These are estrogen receptor-alpha and estrogen receptor-beta. Estrogen binds equally to both types, but isoflavones prefer estrogen receptor-beta. In tissues
that have mostly estrogen-receptor alpha, estrogen has biological effects, but isoflavones may not. This means that isoflavones don’t always act like estrogen. The
effect of isoflavones likely depends in part on the type of estrogen receptors in different tissues.

Soyfoods and Cancer
In Asia, women who eat the most soy have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who eat little soy. But, evidence suggests that this is true only if they also ate soy early in life. Eating soyfoods during childhood and the teen years may protect breast tissue from cancer. Beginning soy consumption later in life doesn’t appear to have any effect on the risk of getting breast cancer. However, women with breast cancer who eat soyfoods are less likely to see their cancer return and are less likely to die from their cancer. The American Cancer Society states that women with breast cancer can safely consume soyfoods. Men may also benefit from eating soyfoods. In Asia, men who eat the most soy have about one-half the risk of getting prostate cancer compared to men who eat little soy. For men who have prostate cancer, soy may be helpful as well. One small study found that soy isoflavones reduced some of the side effects of treatment for prostate cancer. Soyfoods and Heart Health Adding soy protein to diets can lower blood cholesterol by as much as
four percent. When soy is consumed in place of meat and other foods high in saturated fat, it reduces cholesterol even more. In older women, the isoflavones
in soyfoods may improve the health of the arteries, making them more flexible.

Source : www.vegetariannutrition.net